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Walton Historical Society
9 Townsend St
Walton, 13856
 
Phone: +1 607/8655895 +1 607/8655895

Email: whs@waltonhistoricalsociety.org

 

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Sharing Your Memories

The Walton Historical Society believes that you, our community, are one of our greatest historical resources. We encourage young people and long-time residents to share their stories with us, capturing your memories about life in Walton past and present. This will be a history of Walton that one cannot find in any history books. Remember history happens every day! If you have a memory of Walton, please submit below.

Our goal is to build a scrapbook entitled Reminiscences of Life in Walton containing letters from residents with descriptions of memories of town life. We will make the book available for viewing at the Eells House and hope to post some of the letters on the Website too. Your participation is greatly appreciated.

Your Memories

Paul Miller at 90 - PDF document

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Paul Miller at 90
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Excerpts from the diary of Mary Stockton St. John                    by Jeri Ogden

 

Mary was the oldest child of Charles Stockton's 19 children.  She married John Trowbridge St. John and refers to him as Father in her entries.  They had six children.  Their house was a farm on the south side of Walton,known as the Jenks house, and is  currently owned by Donald and Maureen O'Connell on Stockton Ave.  John was one of the village shoemakers.

 

Dec. 17th, 1840 - Cloudy, snowy day.  This is Thanksgiving Day.Rev. Mr. Griswold preached in the church. Father and Martha went.  Pitt Moore came here to live today.  He will go to school and board here and do chores for us.

 

Thurs. Jan 7, 1841 - It has rained in torrents all day which, with the deep snow that was on the ground has made a tremendous flood in the river.  All the flats and the village are completely covered with water.  The little bridge went off.  The water was 2 feet deep in many of the houses.

 

Sat. Nov. 27, 1841 - Cold, unpleasant day. T.S. St. John got home from NYork today. Brought us 2 letters, one from George, one from Eliza. Father got 26 pounds of tallow at ST. John's store.  We had 3 pounds in the house.  We got 4 and one half pounds of beeswax from Judge Ogden today.  

We made 25 dozen candles this evening.

 

Sun. Sept 11, 1842 - .......there has been a circus and managery in Walton today......

 

Mon. Sept 12, 1842 - ......I see the elephant this morning. His keeper has been washing him in the river. He had him in the river 2 hours.  Many people went on the bridge and shores to see him washed.  He is very large, weighs 9000-500 pounds.

 

Sat. March 17th 1843 - Pleasant, but the snow is so deep and drifted, no one went to church from here, but Abram Alford Pine came up this evening and took Ursaly Jones to his house to help his wife sew.

 

Thurs. March 23rd - Cold, blustery, stormy day. Snow is 3 feet deep in the level and some places where it is drifted it is 4 feet deep.  It has not thawed one drop for the past 6 weeks.  The river and brooks are frose solid so that the mills cannot grind any grain.  It is a dreadful time.  Pitt took diner here today. Abram went home this forenoon.  In the afternoon he sawd and drawd round wood for us.

 

Feb 16th, 1844 - Pleasant.  The snowfall 3 inches deep last evening which makes for sleighing. Henry and his wife left here this morning soon after breakfast.  My husband and me visited at Mr. Mores this afternoon.  Martha and Mary went to the Meeting House this evening to hear a man lecture on temperance. We went to Delhi by Hugh the stage driver yesterday and got 25 pounds of tallow.  Paid 18 shillings for it.  It was 9 cents a pound.

 

Thurs. Dec. 24th, 1846 -This day has been cold but pleasant.  We have all been to church.  It is Christmas Eve.  Mr. Hyre preached an excellent sermon.  Mary plaid the organ beautifully and the singing was fine.  The house was very full. Abram assisted David Gay lighting up the house, etc and all things went off well.

 

YOU CAN FIND MORE OF MARY'S EXCERPS FROM HER DIARY IN ONE OF OUR BOOKS FOR SALE:  The Story of Walton 1785-1975.  ONLY $12.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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© Walton Historical Society, 9 Townsend Street, Walton, NY 13856, (607) 865-5895
whs@waltonhistoricalsociety.org